Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Nestlé Phils spends P5.4B on expansion projects this yr

 By Marianne V. Go (The Philippine Star) Updated November 30, 2011 12:00 AM



Tagum, Davao , Philippines — Nestle Philippines, Inc. (NPI) spent P5.4 billion for its operations in the country this year, the bulk of which was spent for its P4.8 billion Tanauan, Batangas Coffee-mate manufacturing plant, according to NPI executive vice president and finance and control director Daniel Aellen.

In an interview at its experimental development facility here, Aellen said NPI is spending P4.8 billion for the construction of its new Coffee-mate manufacturing plant in Tanauan, Batangas, while around P600 million was spent on other machinery and capacity upgrade of its other existing plants in Cabuyao, Laguna; Pulilan, Bulacan and Cagayan de Oro plant.

The Coffee-mate manufacturing plant in Tanauan, which will have a production capacity of 80,000 tons, will be ready for commissioning by the middle of next year.

Last year, Aellen said, NPI’s capital expenditure amounted to around P4 billion which was spent for upgrades of its various plants.

For 2012, NPI is still drawing up its budget, Aellen said, adding that the company is generally upbeat about continued growth for the company.

NPI’s local production includes Nescafe, Bear Brand, formula milk brands such as Nan, Nido powdered milk, as well as Nestle ice cream and yogurt, and powdered milk beverages such as Chuckie.

According to Edith de Leon, head of corporate affairs of NPI, the Coffee-mate plant is just phase 1 of NPI’s expansion plans in the 27-hectare Batangas property.

However, de Leon refused to reveal at this time, NPI’s investment plans for the phase two development of its Batangas plant. All the production of the Tanauan, Batangas plant, she said, is for the domestic market.

The Philipines, De Leon said, is only second to the US in the consumption of the Coffee-mate coffee creamer.

Initially, the Tanauan manufacturing plant, De Leon said, would only produce the original Coffee-mate creamer. She said there are plans in the pipeline to produce flavored creamer varieties.

Meanwhile, NPI continues to help the local coffee industry grow and improve the quality of its coffee beans, specifically the Robusta variety in Mindanao.

Through its experimental and demonstration farm in Tagum, Davao del Norte, NPI is producing quality coffee seedling which coffee farmers can buy to start their own coffee nursery or farm.

According to De Leon, NPI is currently purchasing only 25 percent of its current coffee bean requirement from Filipino farmers because there is simply not enough local production.

As such, NPI still has to import up to 75 percent of its raw coffee bean requirement.

Annual local demand for coffee beans, De Leon said, is estimated by NPI at 64,000 metric tons.

NPI is hoping that with aggressive efforts to revive the Philippine coffee industry, it will be able to reverse its source of raw coffee bean, buying up to 75 percent of its requirement from Filipino coffee growers by 2020.

According to the Department of Agriculture, the local coffee industry registered a negative two percent growth in 2010 and a negative seven percent in the first three quarters of this year.

Optimistically, though, the DA is hoping to post a positive turnaround and growth of five percent next year with an assistance of P163 million for various coffee-related projects.

Friday, November 25, 2011

NESTLÉ WINS ARAW ADVERTISER OF THE YEAR AWARD


Celebrating its centennial year, Nestlé Philippines, Inc. (NPI) recently received the Philippine advertising industry’s top honors, the ARAW Advertiser of the Year Award, which is given to the participating company with the most number of wins across all categories of the competition.

Held every two years, the ARAW Awards, which recognize advertising creativity and effectiveness, are the most coveted in the country. Regarded by many as the “Oscars” or the “Cannes Awards” of local creative competitions, the 2011 Araw Awards served as the culminating event of the recently held 22nd Philippine Advertising Congress at the CWC Convention Center in Camarines Sur.

In winning the Grand Award as Advertiser of the Year, Nestlé Philippines harvested a total of five Gold, ten Silver and 13 Bronze ARAW Awards, including Brand Advertisement wins.

The performance of Nestlé Philippines was boosted by its Kasambuhay, Habambuhay Centennial Anthology of ten short films, as well as its Centennial TV commercial and brand advertising campaigns which have been praised by consumers and industry observers alike.

“We’re deeply honoured to be recognized by the advertising industry as the ‘Advertiser of the Year’ during our year-long celebration of the Centennial of Nestlé Philippines,” said NPI Director of Communications Sandra Puno, “and this recognition of the value of our work is likewise a recognition of the excellent work of our directors, various creative talents in the industry, and partner agencies, Zenith Optimedia and Publicis Manila.

Ms. Puno stressed that the company’s advertising efforts are inspired by consumers and their families, and that Nestlé strives to uphold positive social values that are indispensable to nation-building.

“The award is a great honour for Nestlé Philippines. Our mission is to continue to nurture future generations of Filipino families and to contribute to the development of a strong and prosperous nation. This is a mission we have pursued in the last 100 years. Our advertising is dedicated to supporting the accomplishment of that mission,” Nestlé Philippines Chairman & CEO John Miller said.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Source: BusinessWorld (November 14, 2011)

The BusinessWorld edition of Oct.31, 2011 carried a report headlined "Nestlé officials accused of price fixing", which we would like to address with your kind permission.

The report, which was apparently based on a resolution by the Quezon City Prosecutor's Office dated Aug.15,2011, said: "A city prosecutor's office has found probable cause to charge Nestlé Philippines, Inc. officials with price fixing after distributors complained that the local arm of the food giant required their prodcuts to be sold for a dictated cost."

Apparently, the reporter was not aware that in a subsequent resolution on the same matter dated Oct. 5, 2011, the Quezon City Prosecutor's Office dismissed compalints against officers of Nestlé Philippines, Inc. (NPI) for alleged predatory pricing in violation of Article 186 of the Revised Penal Code. The complaints were filed by Service Edge Distribution, Inc. (SEDI) and FDI Forefront II Trading (FDI), both former distributors of NPI.

In its resolution of Oct.5, the Quezon City Prosecutor's Office reversed its earlier resolution approving the filing of charges in the Quezon City Regional Trial Court. Subsequently, the Quezon City Prosecutor's Office also filed a motion to withdraw from the Quezon City Regional Trial Court all relevant charges on predatory pricing in connection with the case.

The OCt.5 resolution states, "... a cursory reading of the complainant's allegations would readily show that there is no crime commited as the vertical price restraint practice is freely accepted in this jurisdiction as a tool for commerce."

Similar criminal cases filed by the same parties with the Makati and Quezon City Prosecutor's Offices, and an administrative case at the Department of Trade and Industry, have already been dismissed.

We hope that our letter will be useful in providing readers with updated information and correcting any misunderstanding which may have arisen from the report.


Sincerely,

RUSSEL ANDAYA
Senior Vice-President, Head of Legal
Nestlé Philippines, Inc.

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

NESTLÉ OFFICIALS VISIT D.T.I.


Source: Manila Bulletin

Department of Trade and Industry Undersecretaries Cristino L Panlilio (3rd from left) and Zenaida Cuison Maglaya (2nd from left) welcome Mr. Doreswamy Nandu Nandkishore (3rd from right) former Nestlé Philippines, Inc., Chairman and Chief Executive Officer during his visit to the Board of Investments on October 14, 2011. Mr. Nandu was named to succeed Mr.Frits van Dijk as Nestlé S.A. Executive Vice President and Zone Director for Asia, Oceania, Africa, and the Middle East. The Philippines is part of his regional market visit to get updates on Nestlé operations here and to meet with public and private sector leaders. Also in photo (from left) are Anthony Low Regional Manager for Zone Asia, Oceania, Africa, and Middle East; John Martin Miller, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Nestlé Philippines; and Ms.Editha de Leon, Senior Vice President, Head of Corporate Affairs.


Monday, October 24, 2011

Nestlé ramps up investment to meet rising demand

By Patricia Esteves (The Philippine Star) Updated October 24, 2011


MANILA, Philippines - Nestlé, the world’s leading nutrition, health and wellness company, is ramping up investment in Asia, Ocenia, Africa and Middle East (AOA) zone in its quest for future growth, its executive vice-president in charge of that region said.

In an interview with The Star, Nandu Nandkishore said he looks at the AOA zone as the engine of global economic growth because it represents 75 percent of the world’s population.

“Over the next 10 years, we see potentially one billion new consumers in this geography who will be entering a per capita income that will enable them to consume brands,” Nandkishore said.

“At the same time, in the same geography, we also see half a billion consumers who will be entering a sphere of affluence; they will be able to afford premium even luxury goods. There are huge consumer opportunities which needs to be addressed,” he added.

The AOA zone continues to be a significant market for Nestlé which produces brands like Nescafe, Milo, Nido, Bear Brand, Chuckie, Coffee-mate, Nestea, Nesvita, Maggi, Alpo, Purina and Kitkat.

Nandu cited a little bit of history, explaining that back in the 17th century, more than 50 percent of the world’s output came from the AOA zone.

“Some 300 years ago, China, India, Southeast Asia and Africa contribute more than 50 percent to the world’s output. But this has shrunk to maybe about 10 percent. But now, it’s coming back up as these people start to create more affluence. So this zone is definitely an area of the geography which we’re looking for in terms of growth,” he said.

“At the same time, Nestlé also wants to source more talent from this part of the world,” Nandkishore said.

Nandkishore replaced Frits van Dijk who retired last September after 41 years of service to Nestlé. Of Indian nationality, Nandkishore joined Nestlé in 1989 in India where, over the next seven years, assumed increasing responsibilities, mainly in marketing. In 2000, after a short stint at the International Headquarters in Vevey, Switzerland, he returned to Nestlé Indonesia where he was promoted to Market Head in March 2003.

In April 2005, Nandkishore became the market head of Nestlé Philippines. Four years after, in Oct. 2009, he returned to Vevey to take over the role of Global Business Head Infant Nutrition at Nestlé Nutrition.

Last year in September, Nandkishore was nominated as Deputy Executive Vice President in charge of Nestlé Nutrition. As the new Executive Vice President in charge of the AOA zone, Nandkishore will bring a wealth of solid business experience to the company and strong exceptional leadership skills in diverse circumstances.

“His excellent work in Nestlé Nutrition and his strong knowledge together with his great experience in Zone AOA, make him well prepared and qualified to take over this important responsibility,” Nestlé said in a statement announcing his appointment.


Phl a significant market

During the interview, Nandkishore stressed that the Philippines continues to be a significant market for Nestlé and is on target to meet the P100 billion revenue sales. Nestlé has just celebrated its 100th year in the country this year. Nestlé first made its presence in the country in 1911.

Its “billionaire brands” like Milo, Bear Brand, Nescafe and Nido have become icon of sorts in the country.

“The Philippines is a key market and we will continue to invest here,” Nandkishore said.

Last year, Nestlé Philippines racked up sales of P92 billion and in 2009 generated sales of P86 billion.

“The Philippines is one of our top 10 markets worldwide We are on track to get to a P100 billion sales from Nestlé in the Philippines this year which is quite impressive. We are continuing to invest in this economy. There is a direct investment in the form of a new factory we’re setting up in Tanauan to make coffee products and coffee creamer products,” Nandkishore said.

The Tanauan City plant, which will be operational by March 2012, is one of the major manufacturing facilities in the country which includes those in Cagayan de Oro, Cabuyao, Lipa and Pulilan.

Part of its investment program is to develop more coffee plantations and make the Philippines self-reliant on coffee again.

“There is an indirect employment that we create in the form of outreach with coffee farmers, so we have a huge program where we are going to put out two million seedlings every year to develop more coffee plantations,” he said.

“There was a time when the Philippines used to be self-reliant on coffee. Over the years, the local coffee growing industry in the Philippines actually declined. Now what we are trying to do is work once again with the farmers and the government and we have just signed an Memorandum of Agreement (MOU) with the government recently to start to drive once again the Philippines to be a major coffee producer,” Nandkishore said.

Other investments in the Philippines include the establishment of Nestlé business services, the company’s business process outsourcing (BPO) program, which was set up three and half years ago.

Today, Nandkishore said it is one of Nestlé’s most successful BPO centers worldwide.

“We employ 550 people there and we are definitely looking at this as a competent center to invest even more in the coming years,” Nandkishore said.

Nandkishore also unveiled plans to invest with Nestlé’s business partners in the value chain.

“We want to develop the farmers. We want to help develop the entire value chain in a way that creates shared value and we will continue to invest in the Filipino people. Eventually if you look at the philosophy of the way Nestlé does business, it’s all about sustainable value creations, the work sustainable is very important,” Nandkishore said.

Friday, October 7, 2011

Promoting Entrepreneurship in the country

WEDNESDAY, 05 OCTOBER 2011 20:46 JOHN MARTIN MILLER / THE VIEW FROM THE 19TH FLOOR

SOURCE: BUSINESSMIRROR, October 5, 2011

 


Thirty-five-year-old Cresante “Chris” Besas had been making a living driving his own tricycle for 13 years before he caught sight of a poster describing the Nestlé Business on Wheels (BOW) Program. He said he was intrigued by the simplicity of the requirements: “Able to read and write and able to drive a tricycle.” The question he had at that time was, “What kind of business could somebody with those very basic skills possibly have?”

Chris signed up for the BOW Program in January 2008 on borrowed capital. He started realizing the benefits of being a BOWer on his fourth month in the business, when his daily earnings started to exceed his earnings as a tricycle driver.

In a few more months, Chris had saved enough money to help his wife set up a small home-based carinderia.

Soon he was able to buy brand-new appliances to replace the run-down items he had previously bought from surplus shops. After almost one year in the BOW Program, Chris had saved some more to acquire a second unit of BOW, which he asked a cousin to operate.

Chris is one of 418 BOWers who now participate in the Nestlé BOW Program, which provides business opportunities to able-bodied people we call BOWers, who earn by selling Nestlé products to small canteens and carinderias.

The BOW Program is one of three sustainable sales-generating programs designed to open doors of livelihood opportunities to people who want to improve their lives, and all these in the course of doing business.

Our Micro-Distributor Program (MD) provides those who are at least high-school graduates with an opportunity to become small-scale entrepreneurs by selling Nestlé products to sari-sari stores in densely populated areas that cannot be covered by the existing Nestlé distributors’ truck operations. We now have 450 MDs.

Our Ice Cream Street Selling Program provides one livelihood opportunity, where commissioned street vendors ply the streets of residential subdivisions and other high-traffic public areas to sell Nestlé Ice Cream products. Today, we have nearly 2,000 Nestlé Ice Cream cariton vendors in both rural and urban areas.

In all three programs, Nestlé trains the vendors on the proper way of selling, product knowledge and the mechanics of the program they are in. They are equipped with Nestlé-branded cabs and uniforms, and assigned certain territories to tap and develop their accounts. They get their stocks from Nestlé distributors. On any regular day, these enterprising vendors earn a net income higher than the daily minimum wage, with the chance to earn more well within their capacity. BOW, MD and our Ice Cream Street Selling Program are three of the many ways we create shared value, which we at Nestlé define as making a positive difference in the lives of those around us in the course of doing business. Our factories have, likewise, launched Creating Shared Value (CSV) Programs in the communities where they operate, which have given birth to some thriving small businesses.

Our Cut-and-Sew Programs in Lipa, Cabuyao, Cagayan de Oro and Pulilan provide a cottage-industry type of enterprise where barangay residents make use of their sewing skills to supply the factory requirements for uniforms, laboratory gowns, hairnets, shoe covers and rags. Nestlé also creates shared value through our Agronomy Assistance Program, which helps coffee farmers improve both the quality and quantity of their harvest so they will have better income.

Coffee farmers are our fundamental partners in producing coffee products of the highest possible quality for Filipino consumers. At the center of this program is our Nestlé Experimental and Demonstration Farm in Tagum City, Davao, which provides coffee farmers access to new varieties of high-yielding, pest-resistant seedlings, as well as advanced coffee farming technical support and training. We are happy that in our own way, through our Agronomy Assistance Program, we continue to actively grow the coffee-farming industry in the country, encouraging more farmers to plant coffee and converting more lands to coffee farms.

Since the start of this year, around 1,500 hectares of farmland have been planted with new Robusta coffee seedlings and we continue to reach out to more communities all over the country to encourage them to go into coffee farming. As the Chinese proverb says, “Give a man fish and you feed him for a day. Teach him how to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” Opening doors to a better future via livelihood programs is at the very of core of CSV, which is a fundamental part of Nestlé’s DNA and the long-term global approach we take to everything we do. Here in the Philippines, CSV is integral to our mission of nurturing generations of Filipino families. As a board director of the European Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines (ECCP), I am happy to contribute Nestle’s BOW and CSV programs to ECCP’s advocacy of promoting entrepreneurship in the country and improving the lives of the Filipino people.



John Martin Miller is a board director of the European Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines and Nestlé Philippines’ Chairman and CEO. For comments or more information, e-mail info@eccp.com.

Thursday, August 11, 2011

First half 2011: solid performance in a volatile environment



  • Sales of CHF 41.0 billion, 7.5% organic growth, 4.8% real internal growth 
  • Trading operating profit of CHF 6.2 billion, margin of 15.1%; +20 basis points, +40 basis points in constant currencies
  • Consumer facing marketing spend up 6.2% in constant currencies
  • Underlying earnings per share up 5.2% in constant currencies
  • Strong Swiss franc: major impact on consolidation, little effect on operational performance
  • Full-year outlook: organic growth at top end of 5% to 6% range, combined with a margin increase in constant currencies
Paul Bulcke, Nestlé CEO: “Nestlé continued to make good progress in a period characterised by political and economic instability, natural disasters, rising raw material prices and, yes, a strong Swiss franc. This has made for an extremely tough, volatile and competitive environment. But by leveraging our competitive advantages, investing behind our growth drivers and excelling in operational efficiency and effectiveness, we managed to drive growth not only in emerging markets but also in developed countries, especially in Europe. Furthermore we improved our trading operating margin while increasing investment in our brands. For the full year, we expect organic growth at the top end of the 5% to 6% range, combined with a margin increase in constant currencies.”

Vevey, 10 August 2011 – The Group reported organic growth of 7.5% and a trading operating profit margin of 15.1%, up 20 basis points reported, up 40 basis points in constant currencies, from that achieved by the continuing operations in the first half of 2010.

We continued to deliver growth both in emerging and developed markets, with organic growth of 5.7% in the Americas, 5.8% in Europe and 13.3% in Asia, Oceania and Africa. This performance reflects strong alignment and investment in our strategic growth priorities and brands to support our fast-flowing innovation pipeline. We also continued to step up our investment in R&D, factories and capabilities to support our growth in both emerging and developed markets.
 
Click here to read the full article

Monday, July 25, 2011

Broad vision catapults lit major to exec position

By: Abigail L. Ho
Philippine Daily Inquirer


Not all chief executives saw themselves at the helm of a company when they were but teenagers who were about to enter college. Nestlé Philippines Inc. chair and chief executive John Martin Miller certainly had no idea that he would be on the upper echelons at one of the world’s largest manufacturers of fast moving consumer goods.

An English literature and geography major from the University of Durham in England, all he had when he started his career in the 80s was a broad vision of what he wanted to do with his life.

“I did not see myself then as an executive. I had a broad vision of where I wanted to go. I’ve always wanted to work internationally, and that’s what I’m doing now. You shouldn’t have a too-specific idea of where you want to be, as that will restrict you,” he shares in an interview with SundayBiz.

Entering the world of business as a management trainee for a multinational company after earning his degree, he had no qualms about being unable to deliver what the job required of him, despite his lack of hard-core business know-how.

“I have no business qualifications, aside from my years of experience in business now. There weren’t that many business schools when I was growing up,” he relates. “But education is not so much what you study but how you study.”

Starting from the bottom

Although he did not take a business course in college, Miller did have some exposure to business—at least the manual labor side of it—when he was growing up.

His father was in the frozen food business and he helped re-arrange freezers from time to time. He also took on summer jobs during school breaks, the first one being as a shelver at a liquor store in England.

“I earned 33 pence (around P22.50, using present-day conversion rates) an hour, which wasn’t very much. It was a vacation job when I was a teenager,” he recalls. “I also worked in a silkscreen printing factory. That was before I started university.”

Today, after more than three decades of working for various companies, most of which were multinationals, he no longer had to do any heavy lifting, shelving, or freezer re-arranging. The challenges he had to face, however, were no less easier to deal with.

Adapting to diverse cultures



Aside from day-to-day job demands, Miller also had to learn to adapt to various cultures—most of which were as different from his own culture as night was from day.

He was first assigned to Asia in 1990 and had, since then, made the rounds of almost all countries in the region.

Prior to his posting here in the Philippines, he was chair and chief executive of Nestlé Indochina, where he held fort in Thailand, and was managing director of Nestlé Singapore Pte. Ltd. prior to that.

He also served as senior vice president for Danone’s biscuit business in Asia Pacific, a board member at Britannia Industries Ltd. in India, and senior vice president for Unilever Corp.’s personal care business in Africa, Middle East, and Turkey.

During his earlier days with Unilever, he held various senior management positions that got him assigned to the Czech Republic, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Slovak Republic, and the United Arab Emirates.

Even after all those years in Asia Pacific, he admits that he still has a few surprises when he came to work in the Philippines.

“I’ve been visiting the Philippines for more than 20 years, but this is my first time to work here. The Philippines is fascinating because it has so many latent characteristics. It’s a very stimulating country. It has a diverse culture—more than many other Asean countries that I’ve been to,” he relates.

It was mainly the people that set the country apart.

“In working with Filipinos, I’ve seen the passion of the people. The level of emotion, driven by passion and commitment, is extraordinary in the Philippines. That’s part of our success,” he says.

Philippine difference

Now on his third year in the country, Miller says he was still fascinated by the passion of the Filipinos, both those on the factory floors and those on the management side.

Working with such an able team—the best and the brightest in the industry—made his job so much easier, he says.

“During the recent visit of our CEO (Paul Bulcke), he was greatly impressed. He said I got the easiest job. The things I do here are fairly limited: I choose where to invest, I pick people to occupy certain positions, and I manage the external environment,” he relates. “We have an extremely able team. We attract the best and the brightest people, and that makes my job a lot easier. We’re a company of individual leaders, but we work as a seamless team.”

“As one of the many expats working here, we constantly learn about what works and what doesn’t work. We learn how to adapt. Here at Nestlé Philippines, I believe I learn more than I contribute,” he adds.

Apart from the people, he adds that another thing unique about his Philippine experience was the fact that no two days were ever completely alike.

“I don’t have a typical day. No two days are the same. Here, it’s not like in the West where we like being structured and we know how our days will go. Many things happen that you can’t predict. It’s a combination of knowing what you need to do and the things that just happen. That makes my job such an exciting one,” he says.

This made his work life so much more enjoyable—something that was particularly important, especially since there was no big division between his work life and personal life.

During days when he could get some non-work-related things done, he relates that he favored reading biographies, fiction, and business books, as well as running marathons. The last marathon he ran, however, was 10 years ago when his daughter Sophie was born.


Despite his hectic work schedule, he says he always had time for his family. Many times, his Malaysian wife Ying was also involved with the company, working with the wives of the other executives.

“We’re a tight-knit family (at Nestlé Philippines). I know that family’s very important in the Philippines,” he says. “In Nestlé, we involve everybody. We’re a family company.”

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Looking forward to the next 100 years

By: Abigail L. Ho
Philippine Daily Inquirer


Its origins may be Swiss and its current head honcho may be British, but Nestle Philippines Inc. is as Filipino as a local company can get.
 
In a recent interview, Nestle Philippines chair and chief executive John Martin Miller shares how the company has survived 100 years of doing business in the country, and how much it is looking forward to spending another 100 years, or more, here.
 
“We believe very strongly in the Philippines. It has a good talent pool and a lot of resources. It’s a good market for (fast moving consumer goods). We have what we call key markets, and the Philippines is one of them,” he says.
 
As proof of its commitment to the country, the company has invested a fresh P4.8 billion to put up a coffee creamer manufacturing facility in Tanauan, Batangas, which will enable Nestle Philippines to source all of its Coffee Mate locally instead of importing from Thailand.
 
“Our vision for the new P4.8-billion coffee creamer facility is to make it one of the most important manufacturing sites in the world. We have a total of more than 500 worldwide,” he relates.
 
“We have room to expand. We’re hoping to put a new coffee plant on that site, where we can make coffee mixes. Those are very popular here in the Philippines,” he adds.
 
In the coming years, he says Nestle hopes to “re-energize the agriculture sector, especially coffee, which is the second largest market we compete in.”
 
Investments will be made in “knowledge transfer,” where Nestle Philippines will provide coffee farmers with seedlings for the “ideal crop,” to encourage them to go back to coffee farming, he says.


Good people, supportive gov’t

 John Martin Miller

Expanding its business in the Philippines is just one way of giving back to the country that has nurtured it and has provided it with a wide base of loyal customers over the past 100 years.

Miller attributes much of the company’s success to the Filipinos working at Nestle Philippines’ four plants in Lipa, Pulilan, Cabuyao, and Cagayan de Oro, as well as its predominantly Filipino management team.

“As a business, we’re the masters of our destiny. Our success here is a result of the hard work of our people here,” he relates.

Apart from the people, government support has also been instrumental to the company’s success in the country, he adds. Being a 100-year-old company, Nestle Philippines has gone through almost all presidents in the country’s history. So far, government policies have been fair enough and good enough to prompt the constant flow of investments into the country.

The Aquino administration’s firm stance against corruption and its crusade against poverty will serve as further impetus to continue Nestle’s growth in the Philippines.

“We’re very encouraged by the policies of the new government. We’re seeing all of the things that we’d like to see. This government has a strong emphasis on poverty alleviation, on fighting corruption. The business community applauds these efforts. The (public-private partnership) program is also there to upgrade infrastructure,” he relates. “We understand that these things don’t happen overnight. The direction (that the government is taking now) is very encouraging.”

“We welcome greater transparency. As a global company, we uphold good corporate governance. We want to see more of that. We want to see corruption stamped out,” he adds.

Investment-friendly environment

Nestlé Tanauan Factory

Even with past administrations, he says Nestle has always viewed the Philippines as a country that offers an environment conducive for doing business. It is a wonder not more companies are investing here.

“The Philippines has an investment-friendly environment. Why don’t more people invest here?” he says. “I’ve worked in other countries more volatile than the Philippines. The problem is more of perception. A lot of what is happening now—for example, corruption —is not unique to the Philippines,” he relates.

He relates that this year, as Nestle celebrates its 100th year in the country, it is a good time to reflect on how the company has gone through numerous peaks and valleys here, as well as what it has achieved in terms of its business and also in terms of its contribution to Philippine society.

As one of the largest producers of such staples as milk and coffee, he says Nestle has become more than a brand for many Filipinos. For the company’s loyal consumers, Nestle has become a way of life.

“It’s an auspicious time for us to be in the company, as we can reflect on past achievements. We’re one of the larger (fast moving consumer goods) businesses in the Philippines, but it’s not just about the size, but about our contribution to society,” he explains.

“We’ve increased nutrition health awareness, we’ve helped in nation building, and we’re one of the larger taxpayers in the country. Over the past 100 years, we’ve provided shared value, providing returns to our shareholders and relevant contributions to our stakeholders,” he adds.

 Nestlé Center

Moving forward to the next 100 years, he says Nestle is prepared to make more investments in the Philippines—not just to grow its revenue base but also to provide Filipinos with products that can improve their health and their lives.

“Our 100th anniversary is a good time for us to reflect on these things and the future. It’s not just about what we’ve done in the past, but how we can continue to nourish future generations,” he says.

Nestlé to continue expansion in PH

By: Abigail L. Ho
Philippine Daily Inquirer


Consumer goods giant Nestlé Philippines Inc. will be investing more in the country in the coming years, in a bid to offer new products to more markets, particularly consumers on the extreme top and bottom of the economic pyramid.

In an interview with the Inquirer on Thursday, Nestlé Philippines chairman and chief executive John Martin Miller said the company, while already serving a wide spectrum of Filipino consumers, still had markets that were largely untapped.

“We’re looking for growth in many areas. Other business opportunities are being explored. We’re serving most of the consumers in the middle, or the C and D classes, but there’s a population on the top and bottom of the pyramid that we also hope to serve,” he said.

He said Swiss parent firm Nestlé SA remained committed to the Philippines, particularly as the country was considered one of the firm’s key markets.

“We’re bullish about the Philippines. There are a lot of opportunities for growth. We’re optimistic about our prospects,” he said. “We want to raise the level of our investments in the Philippines. This has been fully endorsed by our shareholders.”

One particular focus would be the coffee sector, he said, from which Nestlé Philippines was getting about a third of the raw materials for its second-biggest-selling brand, Nescafe. The bulk of its coffee supply came from Vietnam and Indonesia.

Moving forward, he said the company hoped to source up to 70 percent of its coffee requirements from local farmers.

“We want to breathe new life into the coffee-growing sector. During his recent visit here, (Nestlé SA chief operating officer Paul Bulcke) stressed our commitment to providing employment in the countryside. We want to encourage people to go back to agriculture, especially coffee farming,” he said.

Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Downtown"




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Monday, July 11, 2011

Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Unplugged"

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Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Sign Seeker"




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Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Silup"




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Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Isang Tasang Pangarap"




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Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Tingala Sa Baba"




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Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "The Howl and the Fussyket"





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Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Cooking Mo, Cooking Ko"





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Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Oh! Pa Ra Sa Ta U Wa Yeah!"





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Nestle Philippines Kasambuhay Habambuhay Short Film Anthology: "Sali-Salita"




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Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Nestlé protects coffee, choco drinks - No price hike expected soon

By: Bernie Cahiles-Magkilat
Manila Bulletin

MANILA, Philippines — Nestlé Philippines Inc. (NPI) does not discount any price hike of its products for the remaining of the year but said it is protecting coffee and Milo, two products that Filipinos love most.

John Miller, NPI president told reporters at the sidelines of the recent media event over the weekend for the visit of Nestlé S.A. chief operating officer Paul Bulcke to the local unit, which is celebrating its 100th year of operation in the country.

According to Miller, although he does not see any further price adjustments of their products soon, he cannot be sure if they would seek price hike in the future.

Earlier, NPI has raised prices of its milk products to account for the increase in prices of milk solids in the international market.

“But we are protecting our Nescafe and Milo products,” Miller said. Nescafe and Milo products are two preferred Nestlé products by Filipinos.

During the visit, Bulcke has acknowledged the upward trend in prices of food products. But the company has been trying to cope with high prices of raw materials through various efficiency measures in their operations. He cited its efficient procurement processes, product innovation on packaging and sourcing. He said that price increase is only resorted to once all other measures have been exhausted.

Bulcke also announced that the Philippines is included among the beneficiaries of its 500 million Swiss francs for its coffee program, which seeks to augment coffee production via some form of assistance granted to farmers.

He did not elaborate on how it would be allocated for the Philippines under that coffee budget, but said the coffee farming initiative of Nescafe is expected to revive coffee production in the country by linking up with coffee farmers in terms of support, technology, planting requirements and seedlings. Doing so, he said, would make Nestlé less dependent on imported green coffee beans for Nescafe’s production.

At present, Nestlé buys 85 percent of local coffee beans and imports the rest from Vietnam and Indonesia because of insufficient local production.

“The Philippines should be part of this coffee production initiative because the conditions necessary are there like the right climate and environment to accelerate coffee production,” Bulcke said.

At present, Nestlé has an experimental coffee production in Davao.

Improving coffee production in countries where they operate is Nestlé’s strategy to increase local sourcing of raw materials. The strategy is expected to make its operation more cost efficient, help the plight of coffee farmers and promote sustainability. Over 90 percent of the products the company sold locally are produced locally.

Nestlé Philippines has four factories manufacturing coffee, milk, chocolate energy drinks, cereals, infant nutrition products, ice cream and chilled dairy products. A fifth Nestlé factory is under construction in Tanauan, Batangas and will start operations in 2012.

Nestlé has invested over P10 billion in the country in the past five years, with P4.8 billion allocated for the Tanauan facility. The bulk of these investments have gone towards enhancing production capability to meet growing local demand.




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Nestlé reaffirms long-term commitment, gears up local materials sourcing

By Bernie Cahiles-Magkilat
Manila Bulletin

MANILA, Philippines — Nestlé S.A. chief operating officer Paul Bulcke has re-affirmed NestléGroup’s long\term commitment to the Philippines as the world’s largest food and beverage company further gears up local sourcing of raw materials for local production, especially with the inclusion of the Philippines for its 500 million Swiss francs coffee program aimed at making its local coffee production self-sufficient.

Bulcke was here in the country for an update on Nestlé operations and to meet with public and private sector leaders. His visit coincided the company’s 100th year of operation in the Nestlé in the Philippines. He was accompanied by Nestle S.A. executive vice president Fritz van Dijk, zone director for Asia, Oceania, Africa and the Middle East.

“The Philippines continues to grow in importance to Nestlé. We believe that making long-term investments will help unlock the country’s great potential. The diversity and dynamism of Filipinos and the favorable demographic and economic growth trends mean that the country will continue to draw foreign investments which, I believe, will contribute significantly to its growth and development,” Bulcke said in a roundtable discussion with journalists over the weekend.

Bulcke announced that the Philippines would be among developing countries that would benefit from its 500 million Swiss francs budget for coffee farming production.

He did not elaborate on how it would be allocated for the Philippines under that coffee budget, but said the coffee farming initiative of Nescafe is expected to revive coffee production in the country by linking up with coffee farmers in terms of support, technology, planting requirements and seedlings.

Doing so, he said, would make Nestlé less dependent on imported green coffee beans for Nescafe’s production.

At present, Nestlé buys 85 percent of local coffee beans and imports the rest from Vietnam and Indonesia because of insufficient local production.

“The Philippines should be part of this coffee production initiative because the conditions necessary are there like the right climate and environment to accelerate coffee production,” Bulcke said.

At present, Nestlé has an experimental coffee production in Davao.

Bulcke also said that while the growth of Nestlé in emerging markets could double in 10 years, the produce in these markets are not meant to supply the requirements of the developed economies.

Nestlé’s sales in these markets currently amount to CHF 39 billion or 35 percent of turnover, and projected to grow 45 percent by 2020.

“We have worldwide expansions depending on the capability and capacity of each market but the acceleration of growth is in the emerging markets,” Dijk said noting that Nestlé has 450 factories globally and most of these are very local. Dijk used to serve Nestlé Philippines.

Nestlé locally manufactures 90 percent of the products sold in the Philippine market.

“Food is very local,” Bulcke said thus the strategy is to increase local sourcing for local production.

Nestlé Philippines has four factories manufacturing coffee, milk, chocolate energy drinks, cereals, infant nutrition products, ice cream and chilled dairy products. A fifth Nestlé factory is under construction in Tanauan, Batangas and will start operations in 2012.

Nestlé has invested over P10 billion in the country in the past five years, with P4.8 billion allocated for the Tanauan facility.

The bulk of these investments have gone towards enhancing production capability to meet growing local demand.

On pressure on food prices, Bulcke said Nestlé has been in the forefront to increase investments in R & D in agriculture noting that only a meager one-fifth of R &D expenses are spent on this sector.

“The world owes so much to agriculture,” he said.

While he acknowledged the upward trend in prices of food products, Bulcke said they are trying to cope through various efficiency measures in their operations. He cited its efficient procurement processes, product innovation on packaging and sourcing.

He said that price increase is only resorted to once all other measures have been exhausted.




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Nestlé to continue expansion in PH

By: Abigail L. Ho
Philippine Daily Inquirer

Consumer goods giant Nestlé Philippines Inc. will be investing more in the country in the coming years, in a bid to offer new products to more markets, particularly consumers on the extreme top and bottom of the economic pyramid.

In an interview with the Inquirer on Thursday, Nestlé Philippines chairman and chief executive John Martin Miller said the company, while already serving a wide spectrum of Filipino consumers, still had markets that were largely untapped.

“We’re looking for growth in many areas. Other business opportunities are being explored. We’re serving most of the consumers in the middle, or the C and D classes, but there’s a population on the top and bottom of the pyramid that we also hope to serve,” he said.

He said Swiss parent firm Nestlé SA remained committed to the Philippines, particularly as the country was considered one of the firm’s key markets.

“We’re bullish about the Philippines. There are a lot of opportunities for growth. We’re optimistic about our prospects,” he said. “We want to raise the level of our investments in the Philippines. This has been fully endorsed by our shareholders.”

One particular focus would be the coffee sector, he said, from which Nestlé Philippines was getting about a third of the raw materials for its second-biggest-selling brand, Nescafe. The bulk of its coffee supply came from Vietnam and Indonesia.

Moving forward, he said the company hoped to source up to 70 percent of its coffee requirements from local farmers.

“We want to breathe new life into the coffee-growing sector. During his recent visit here, (Nestlé SA chief operating officer Paul Bulcke) stressed our commitment to providing employment in the countryside. We want to encourage people to go back to agriculture, especially coffee farming,” he said.


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Monday, July 4, 2011

Nestlé Kasambuhay, Habambuhay Short Film Anthology on Sunday's Best


Catch the TV premiere of the
Nestlé Kasambuhay Habambuhay
Short Film Anthology on ABS-CBN Sunday's Best,
July 10 at 10:45PM.

Invite your family and friends to watch!

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

NESTLÉ GLOBAL CEO AFFIRMS COMMITMENT TO PHILIPPINES


In a meeting with President Benigno Aquino at Malacanang Palace, Nestlé S.A. CEO Paul Bulcke re-affirmed the Nestlé Group’s commitment to the Philippines as the company celebrates its 100th year of doing business in the country.

Accompanied by Nestlé S.A. EVP Frits van Dijk, Zone Director for Asia, Oceania, Africa and the Middle East, and Nestlé Philippines, Inc. Chairman and CEO John Miller, Mr. Bulcke is in the country for an update on Nestlé operations in the Philippines and to meet with public and private sector leaders.

“The global Nestlé family proudly congratulates Nestlé Philippines on its centennial. This is a remarkable milestone in its enduring mission to provide generations of Filipino families with tasty food and beverage products that promote nutrition, health, and wellness. We are deeply grateful for the trust that Filipinos have put in Nestlé brands through the years,” Mr. Bulcke said.

Mr. Bulcke said the Nestlé Group looks forward to the next 100 years of serving future generations of Filipinos with high-quality brands offering affordable nutrition. These brands are supported by Nestlé’s outstanding food and nutrition R & D capability, which is the largest in the world. “We will strive to continue to create shared value by working with leading stakeholders in society and by focusing upon nutrition, water management and rural development, all of which are areas that are particularly pertinent to our business. We take very seriously our corporate responsibility towards our shareholders, the local communities where we operate and the society that we serve. In this way we build long term sustainable businesses which benefit a wide range of stakeholders. This is the case both in the Philippines and globally,” he said.

Mr. van Dijk, who served Nestlé Philippines, Inc. for many years, said that the Philippines is a key market for Nestlé both in ASEAN and worldwide. Sales of Nestlé Philippines totaled PhP 92 billion in 2010, making it the 8th largest corporation locally. NPI currently has four factories manufacturing coffee, milks, chocolate energy drinks, cereals, infant nutrition products, ice cream and chilled dairy products.

A fifth Nestlé factory is under construction in Tanauan, Batangas, and will start operations in 2012. “As Nestlé Philippines marks its centennial, the ongoing construction of the Tanauan factory is a concrete re-affirmation of our commitment to the Philippines,” said Mr. van Dijk. Nestlé has invested over PhP 10 billion in the country in the past five years, with PhP 4.8 billion allocated for the Tanauan facility. The bulk of these investments have gone towards enhancing production capability to meet growing local market demand.

Mr. Bulcke said, “By opening a new factory, we are closer to our consumers and our valued customers. At the same time, we are able to enhance local economic activity by creating employment and business opportunities for partners and suppliers.”

Turning to global operations, Mr. Bulcke said that a significant portion of Nestlé’s growth has and will come from emerging markets, in which it is already strongly represented. Nestlé sales in these markets currently amount to CHF 39 billion or 35 percent of turnover, and are projected to grow to 45 percent by 2020.

“The Philippines continues to grow in importance to Nestlé. We believe that making long-term investments will help unlock the country’s great potential. The diversity and dynamism of Filipinos and the favorable demographic and economic growth trends mean that the country will continue to draw foreign investments which, I believe, will contribute significantly to its growth and development. Nestlé’s long-standing presence in the Philippines and our ongoing investments re-affirm our confidence in the country and our commitment to nurture future generations of Filipino families,” Mr Bulcke said.

Friday, June 3, 2011

Nestlé celebrates 100 years in Pinoy culture



BY ED UY STAFF WRITER

SOURCE: The Manila Times

FROM the President’s sister Kris Aquino, Mega couple Sharon Cuneta and Sen. Francis “Kiko” Pangilinan, Piolo Pascual, Regine Velasquez, Ogie Alcasid, Ai-Ai de las Alas, Pokwang, Kim Chu and Gerald Anderson (who arrived separately and chatted briefly), to Eddie Garcia, Marvin Agustin, Mike Enriquez and other notable personalities—the guest list was enviable as it was impressive. It was after all an event that was 100 years in the making.

Nearly a thousand people graced the premiere screening of Nestlé’s short film anthology Kasambuhay, Habambuhay on Sunday at the Newport Theater in Resorts World Manila.

With the theme, “Companion in Life, for Life,” for its centennial celebrations, Nestlé Philippines first came up with a heartwarming 90-second television advertisement that illustrates how the company’s products have become a significant part of Filipino family life.

John Miller, CEO and chairman for Nestlé Philippines, said: “This relationship with the Filipino consumers, anchored on the quality of our brands and the role that these much loved brands have played in helping nurture and nourish Filipino families, is what led us to our centennial theme Kasambuhay, Habambuhay.”

100 years in the telling

But with still so many great stories left to tell, Nestle decided to come up with Sine Kasambahay, a 100-minute anthology of 10 short, entertaining and creative films each reflecting a part of Philippine culture and how each of their brand has become part of Philippine culture.

The bar, however, had been set quite high as Nestle had produced some of the most memorable ads and catchphrases throughout the years—from “I remember yesterday the world was so young;” “Great things start from small beginnings;” “Let’s sit and talk awhile;” to favorites such as “You’re my No.1;” and “I-bottomless ang saya.”

Choosing from a select roster of commercial directors who have previously helmed Nestlé TV commercials, the challenge was to capture the wide spectrum of emotions and present it in a way that shows how Nestle has become a part of Pinoy culture itself.

The directors pitched stories of various genres for brands Bear Brand Powdered Milk Drink, Nescafé, Milo, Nestea, Mido, Coffee-Mate, Maggi, Bear Brand Sterilized, Nestlé Ice Cream, Koko Krunch, Nestlé Fruit Selection Yogurt and Nestlé Fitnesse. The exercise yielded a spectrum of stories—but there could only be one story per brand. After a difficult process of selection, 10 stories were selected, which vary from drama, romantic comedy, musical, fantasy, satire, family comedy, suspense, adventure, mock-umentary and even a Shakespearean parody.

“We envisage the films as an opportunity to look to the future and our mission to continue providing Filipinos with tasty and high-quality products that promote nutrition, health and wellness,” Miller said. “Creativity plays a central role in this mission and these excellent films display the very best of Filipino creative talent in the realm of filmmaking.”

“Through this film series, we would like to thank and honor the generations of Filipino consumers and families who have put their trust in Nestlé and its brands, and have made them a part of their everyday lives,” Nestlé Communications director Sandra Puno said.

Sine Kasambahay opened with “The Howl and the Fussyket” (Eugene Domingo and Kiray Celis), a humorous take on how the family comes together during competitions—whether it’s for a national contest or in this case a second grade declamation. Determined to help her son win despite his obvious “f” and “p” speech defect, (“What a veautiful ‘fussy’ you are!”), Domingo decides to hire a call center agent and an upstart stage actor to prepare him for the contest and taking the word “kinareer” to new heights.

Next was “Unplugged” (Eddie Garcia, Marvin Agustin, and Kaye Abad) a story of a young football team who goes on a field trip to the province to learn the value of team work. Initially too caught up with their gadgets, the boys eventually learn to value the simpler things in life and unlock a new world of natural wonder of nature and discovery—that going offline is the only way to reconnect back to life

"Silup” (Sid Lucero and Gloria Romero) on the other hand is a peek into the often dangerous life of a cop—his dealings with denizens and the crimes they commit; why he has remained single; and the reason behind his seemingly strange and symbolic routine of taking out a can of sterilized milk and depositing his gun in place.

Paying comedic homage to the epic film Himala, “Isang Tasang Pangarap” (Ramon Bautista) tells the story of Elias, a down and out young man whose most prized possession is a shiny red coffee cup. After an encounter with a Nora Aunor-looking sari-sari store owner, Elias gains the ability to tell the future and with it the fame and responsibility that goes with his newfound power.

The mere appearance of Kuya Bodjie Pascua of Batibot fame in “Sali Salita” (Migs Cuaderno, Bodjie Pascua and Judy Chua) was a giveaway that some good story telling was about to ensue, and he did not disappoint. The story was about a mother who writes children’s storybooks but doesn’t have enough time to create stories for her own son. The young boy eventually finds the attention he desperately craves for with the arrival of his grandfather (Pascua). Together the two fill up an empty milk can with words and creates a magical tale of heroes and villains—all that was needed was a good ending.

Fans of the Nicos in the Nestea-serye of commercials will enjoy “Oh! Pa Ra Sa Ta U Wa Yeah!” (Neil Coleta and Jillian Ward), which takes the Clemente family on an MTV-esque road trip. But while the entire family was in high spirits, Nicos seemed to be out of it. Seeing his son distraught in trying to figure out Mattina, Nicos’s father finally shares the centuries-old family heirloom—an alphabetical manual of how their clan courted women.

One of the most applauded and the best films of the night, “Downtown” (Virgilio Que) is a tale of an aging Chinese man who has floated through life with his ladylove by his side. But now, times have changed as he begins each day waking up alone on his bed made for two. He becomes distant, alienating people around him and realizes that even a cup of coffee has it better because it will always have a creamer as its mate. He eventually decides to get his act together for a second shot at the greatest thing in life—love.

“Tingala sa Baba” (Arby Cesar Viduya, and Eubert Marc de la Cruz) is a coming of age satire featuring two kids on a seesaw from different social backgrounds. The chubby kid who comes from a well to do family finds himself always at the bottom—looking up to a lanky child brought up in poverty. How they try to reverse positions shows just how friendship is more valuable than money and the true worth of a friend.

The classic tale of Romeo and Juliet takes on a Shakespearean (or is it Balagtasan) twist in “Cooking Mo, Cooking Ko” (Isay Alvarez, Nonie Buencamino and Robert Sena) as two warring families try to battle it out for carinderia supremacy—while their two children have secretly fallen in love with each other. It portrays the often copy-cat mentality of Filipinos and our love for food.

Finally, “Sign Seeker” (John Lloyd Cruz and Solenn Heussaff) takes the Filipino belief in superstition to a romantic level as a young man seeks all sorts of divine signs to determine his decision to ask the girl of his dreams out on a date. As each sign materializes, however, he begins to ask for more unfathomable ones as the fear of rejection seems too much for him to bear. John Lloyd Cruz once again proves why he is one of the best actors of today, as he shines throughout the 10 short minutes, making you wish it was a full-length movie instead.

The films will be shown to the public on June 10 at SM Megamall. June 11 and 12 will Free Movie Weekend, and viewers get to watch for free at selected SM cinemas nationwide (Megamall Cinema 3, Southmall Cinema 6, Rosales Cinema 1, Davao Cinema 1 and Cebu Cinema 7). Five lucky viewers (one per cinema) will get a chance to win P10,000 per area just by voting for their favorite short film.

Nestle also published a centennial cookbook entitled Celebrating 100 years of Cooking with Nestlé. It features 100 easy-to-prepare, affordable and tasty recipes developed for Filipino taste buds using Nestlé products.

Miller added that its century-long presence in the Philippines is just the start of things to come and concluded: “Our mission continues into the future as we forward to the next 100 years. That mission centers on our commitment to nurture generations of Filipino families with tasty products that promote nutrition, health and wellness.”